Carrier Oils

Carrier oils are versatile oils which can be used to manufacture many natural products including massage oils, ointments, skincare products and soaps. We offer a diverse range of premium quality oils, many of which are certified organic.
Pure Nature carrier oils come packed in amber glass up to 100ml.
For 250ml sizes and above, oil... Show More

Carrier oils are versatile oils which can be used to manufacture many natural products including massage oils, ointments, skincare products and soaps. We offer a diverse range of premium quality oils, many of which are certified organic.
Pure Nature carrier oils come packed in amber glass up to 100ml.
For 250ml sizes and above, oils are packed in light-proof, food grade, BPA-free plastic (HDPE) bottles and Jerry cans. All packs are gas flushed with nitrogen to maintain the freshness of the oil. 

Methods of extraction

Mechanical Extraction: For this method the oils are mechanically crushed in order to physically force the oils from the plant matter. It produces a higher yield than cold pressing but the process can heat the oil during extraction.

Cold Pressed: This a mechanical extraction method where the temperature during extraction does not go above a defined measure - typically 45 - 50°C. 
Many consider this to be the premium and preferred extraction method as excess heat can affect some components in the oil. 

Virgin Oils: These are oils that are taken from the first pressing of the source material.

Solvent:The most efficient method for extracting oils, the source material is crushed and the oil extracted using an organic solvent - usually Hexane. Hexane readily evaporates leaving only a minute trace in the finished oil. This is the most common method of extraction due to the high yields produced, most supermarket food oils are produced in this method.

Oil refining
Contrary to popular opinion, most cold- pressed unrefined oils are not particularly appealing to either manufacturers or consumers. They tend to have strong colour and odour and may contain undesirable (from a manufacturing perspective) waxes and other solids. As such, most will undergo at least some degree of refining.

Common techniques used to refine oils include:

Degumming: During manufacture, oils can create 'gums' if they come into contact with water. By washing the oil with water any water-soluble components are easily removed.

Bleaching:Diatomaceaous Earth is used to filter the oil which removes strong colours which can be problematic in many personal care formulations.

Alkali refining: The oil is treated with an alkali solution made from caustic soda to remove free fatty acids (which cause rancidity) and other impurities. This is a similar process to cold process soap making.

Deodorising:The oil is treated with steam to remove undesirable odours.

Winterizing: Some oils will turn a turbid colour when they are cold (an effect easily seen when storing extra virgin oils in the fridge) as waxes solidify and make the oil appear cloudy. Winterized oils have been chilled so the waxes can be easily removed during manufacture.

A common misconception is that cold pressed is always the best option. Certainly oil made this way may have small amounts of extra nutrients and it has other advantages - particularly from a marketing perspective. However,  if you want a stable, low odour, low colour oil for your product then a refined oil is probably your best option.

 

 

 

 


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